Bridezilla’s #1 Nemesis: Rebecca Mead, Marriage Muckraker

Posted by on 04 Jun, 2007

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Sigh…it is a known fact that each moment of Bridezilla’s life is a study in unsurpassed brilliance. And yet, it seems not a day goes by lately that our hours aren’t dampened by mention of this bliss-less brown wren of a writer Rebecca Mead, buzzing in our ear like a defunct hair dryer.
As you can probably presume just by looking at this picture of Mead we lifted off Salon’s recent article ” The Marriage Industrial Complex,”Mead doesn’t like elaborate weddings. She feels garter tossing and engagement rings are superfluous and devoid of meaning. So she had herself a dreary, gloomy frill-free little wedding ceremony at city hall wearing, wait for it-everyday office attire, and now she wants you all to do the same!
Needless to say, Mead thinks this morose marital behavior makes her a morally superior human being, so much so that she is going around touting it in her “expose” “One Perfect Day, The Selling of the American Wedding,” a tedious tome that attempts to meticulously debunk the validity of every nuptial tradition Bridezilla and her many legions of blushing brides hold sacred and dear.
Well we have news for you Miss Mead: tradition or no, we at Bridezilla will take our vibrant superficiality over your curdling cynicism any day. And for the record, we think matching almonds candy shells with menu colors is a much cooler pastime than spending your days as a marriage muckraker. A bit of a waste of an Oxford degree, if you ask us.

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  1. On 10 Apr, 2010, Sevant said:

    Mead’s book, rather than a Dateline-esque expose, or a strictly finger pointing damnation against wedding vendors, (though reading its reviews online, her book sure touched a nerve) instead explores the cultural forces, unspoken hopes and wishes at work that turn otherwise sane people into irrational Brizillas, how the wedding industry feeds and encourages and indeed distorts into unsightly proportions couples’ legitimate desire to show commitment.
    Mead is an anomaly whom I believe by writing this book hopes to keep the wedding day in perspective and on an even keel, after all, wedding is just one day, but marriage, which the wedding celebrates, is supposed to last a life time.

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