Committed by Gilbert: Leave It On the Shelf or Commit?

Posted by on 23 Apr, 2010

elizabeth gilbert committed.jpgAs much as I Love to hate Elizabeth Gilbert (in a I-can’t-stand-you-because-you-make-a-living-traveling way) and Pray that she loses a tooth (because she’s intelligent, rich, and pretty) I Eat her books like I’m desert-island stranded and she’s the last author on earth.
Sure, her tales of travel in Eat, Pray Love make me green with bridezilla envy, but she has writing chops. I enjoyed Eat, Pray, Love and hated it at the same time because she’s writing about a life rich with pasta, hot Italian guys, and “finding herself.”
Ohhh, the unfairness – just imagine the luxury of a much-delayed gap year with actual money to spend.
She may have the Eat, Praying, and Loving thing down, but what could Gilbert, a divorcee possibly tell this bridezilla about marriage?

Committed, Required Reading for Every Bridezilla


Gilbert and her Brazilian-born-lover (sigh) Felipe can’t live together in the US unless they tie the knot. Together they roam the planet in search of a reason to get married. No jobs. No family obligations. Nothing to do but travel, eat, and talk. In Southeast Asia.
Both have been emotionally damaged by their past divorces. Unlike those young, naive bridezillas, who want the party in the princess dress, Gilbert is apprehensive about tying the knot. So she does what every good writer does – she researches it.
Truthfully, the beginning nearly put me to sleep. It read like an 8th- grade history book. She goes into the entire history of marriage when I wanted the juicy tidbits of her relationship with Felipe. I don’t care that the early Christians didn’t believe in marriage. I don’t care about Buddha’s views on desire and infatuation.
I care about you holing up in Bali with a Brazilian-millionaire-lover, exiled from your hometown. That’s much more interesting.
That said, the book takes an exciting turn after the first few chapters. She starts talking to people about their life decisions – what makes a marriage tick? Can a woman have her own identity in a marriage? Is marriage more beneficial to a man or woman? What’s the point of a marriage ceremony? (It’s not to show off your Vera Wang gown.)
It’s not a beach read – this is a serious book, so put on those Versace reading glasses. One you get passed the first few chapters, you won’t want to put it down. Committed should be required reading for every bridezilla on her way down the aisle.

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